Braided delta of Vouga River, part IV


This is a traditional fishermen´s boat from the mouth of the Vouga river, central Portugal.
Barco Moliceiro, this is how the Portuguese call the boat, is usually painted with bright colors and decorated with some rather primitive ornaments.
The name comes from the word Moliço, which means the submerged aquatic vegetation ( seagrass ) collected for use in agriculture
.
The boats are still used to catch fish and seagrass today.


Photographed at low tide, 28th of October 2009.

Nikon D80
Tripod
Rubber boots.


Maciek.

Braided delta of Vouga River, part III

Vouga river delta.
October 2009



Nikon D80
Tripod
Rubber fishing boots.



Maciek.

In the realm of the dying sun


For the first time I managed to convince my son Lucas to go with me. Big achievement !


Picture above: Douro river in the realm of the dying sun: last rays of sun illuminating the scene.
By lifting 0.3 EV I managed to create a little 3D volume of the picture.


Photographed in the evening
27th of October 2009


Maciek.

Lord of the Stone Chapel. I´m back !




So the winter is coming. The temperatures have fallen to lower twenties. Lower temperatures mean more image sharpness in the coastal zone. Today I was back to one of my favorite spots: Lord of the Stone Chapel. My previous photos can be found here.




Maciek.

Nikon D80
ISO 200
f/20.0
EV -0.3
Fl 20 mm.

Dinky boat

It was a stormy night. The sun was down. Strong wind was blowing inland. The seaside boulevard was completely abandoned. There was only me and this small, half filled with water dinky.


Nikon D80
Sigma DC 17/70
Manfrotto Tripod
F 8
ISO 500
FL 17 mm

Maciek.

20thOct 2009.
18.45.

Our garden colors in early October



From the top left:

Doux très Long Red Pepper plant,

red tomato,

red mini cherry tomatoes,

yellow Fargo-type tomatoes,

and a colorful butterfly.






All pictures taken on the same day, 17th Oct, 2009.





Maciek

Conch houses of Key West

A typical Key West architecture. House at Whitehead St., Key West.


What is a conch house? Early settlers of the Florida Keys built their homes of a molter made from sand, water, and lime. The settlers obtained their lime by burning conch shells. Having no building stones or bricks, but an abundance of conch shells the settlers often utilized the shell itself in constructing their houses. Thus the term "conch" house had its beginning. Later, wooden homes built by settlers and ship's carpenters utilizing a blend of architectural styles took on the name of conch houses. ( from http://www.floridakeysbest.com/ ).


Nikon D80
Sigma 10-20
Polar. filter
Manfrotto tripod + head
Shutter release
ISO 100
Aperture f9,5
Exposure 1/8sec


Maciek.


Vinha D´Ervideira Rosé


We drank today this very nice Portuguese pink wine: Vinha D´Ervideira from Alentejo region. Wine is made from Alfroncheiro, Aragonez and Tinta Caiada grapes.

This highly aromatic but still rosé wine is very food friendly - it can be paired with a great assortment of food textures. Today we did it with Agnieszka´s Bologna lasagna and it proved to be an excellent choice for this hot October day in Porto.



Maciek.


Sunset at Mosteiros, Azores Islands.


At night I traveled to Mosteiros, a remote village at the very Westernmost point of the island. There was a black sandy beach and some huge blocks of volcanic rock rising from the ocean not far from the beach. Some surfers were hitting the waves nearby.
I took my shoes off, put a camera on the tripod and shot a picture.


Maciek.
02nd of October 2009.